HELP! Sf Cook programs or Recipes

Smokinitalian

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When using the smoke fire cook program or recipes does anyone know what temperature the grill should be set at for these programs
 

bbqking

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350?
 

abmet

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Each one should tell you when you hit start preparation.
I haven’t actually used one to cook though.
FC737888-ED82-4228-93A5-FD94228E80F5.jpeg
 

Bruno

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I see no point in those cook plans. You need to have a solid plan and know what you are looking for and when.
For example learn about the stall and when to wrap and what to wrap with.
 

JpsBBQ

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I see no point in those cook plans. You need to have a solid plan and know what you are looking for and when.
For example learn about the stall and when to wrap and what to wrap with.
I agree. They dumb things down so far they are actually more trouble and more difficult than just learning some simple doneness temperatures. Every protein you cook is unique and one should learn to treat them accordingly.
 

Dassman5

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In my humble opinion, those cooking recipes are more of a sales gimmick and to attract novice backyard cooks...a category that probably should never own a pellet grill
 
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Smokinitalian

Smokinitalian

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In my humble opinion, those cooking recipes are more of a sales gimmick and to attract novice backyard cooks...a category that probably should never own a pellet grill
As and 80 year old who has been grilling for more than 50 years, I welcome innovation. On the other hand I could be content baking pineapple upside-down cake in my Weber Sumit and let new gimmicks slip by my own little humble world.
 

JpsBBQ

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I understand and agree with continued improvement in the technology. That said, I simply view this particular innovation as a solution in search of a problem. As always, I could easily be wrong and my mind could be changed with personal experience. Time will tell.
 

rwhapham

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The only "cooking program" that I think would be beneficial (that I already sent as an idea to Weber) is to program Smoke Boost to turn off after a set period of time. That would be the icing on the cake for overnight cooks. Put your brisket or pork butt on, set your SF to run Smoke Boost for a few hours, then automatically set the temp. No need to wake up before the sun just to turn it off yourself.
 

Bruno

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The only "cooking program" that I think would be beneficial (that I already sent as an idea to Weber) is to program Smoke Boost to turn off after a set period of time. That would be the icing on the cake for overnight cooks. Put your brisket or pork butt on, set your SF to run Smoke Boost for a few hours, then automatically set the temp. No need to wake up before the sun just to turn it off yourself.
Do you find you get more smoke in smoke boost than say 225?
 

Dassman5

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Do you find you get more smoke in smoke boost than say 225?
In my experience the SmokeBoost does produce more smoke than at 225F and above. It it negligible compared to 200F. It’s real benefit is when starting with large cool pieces of meat like full packer briskets or large pork butts and thick pork bellies, as the smoke ring has more time to penetrate the meat before the surface becomes warm.
 

JpsBBQ

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The only "cooking program" that I think would be beneficial (that I already sent as an idea to Weber) is to program Smoke Boost to turn off after a set period of time. That would be the icing on the cake for overnight cooks. Put your brisket or pork butt on, set your SF to run Smoke Boost for a few hours, then automatically set the temp. No need to wake up before the sun just to turn it off yourself.
Yeah, I like the idea of being able to program your own personal settings much more than preprogrammed ones.
 

rexster314

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The smoke ring is not produced by smoke itself.
" The smoke ring is produced by a chemical reaction between the pigment in the meat and the gases produced from wood or charcoal. When burned, these organic fuels produce nitrogen dioxide gas. This gas infuses into the surface of the meat as it cooks surrounded by the smoke. It reacts with water in the meat and produces nitric oxide." From https://www.thespruceeats.com/barbecue-smoke-ring-333612 if you would like to read on. It explains it better than I could
 

Dassman5

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The smoke ring is not produced by smoke itself.
" The smoke ring is produced by a chemical reaction between the pigment in the meat and the gases produced from wood or charcoal. When burned, these organic fuels produce nitrogen dioxide gas. This gas infuses into the surface of the meat as it cooks surrounded by the smoke. It reacts with water in the meat and produces nitric oxide." From https://www.thespruceeats.com/barbecue-smoke-ring-333612 if you would like to read on. It explains it better than I could
Correct, but most of diffusion or chemical reaction between the nitrous oxide produced by combustion and the myoglobin in the the meat occurs in the earlier stages when the meat is cooler. Based on my 30 plus years of smoking, Once the meat heats up and begins to “sweat” the water increasingly works its way to the surface, and the smoke ring no longer penetrates as far.

it is also why “mopping or spritzing” the meat helps to keep the surface cool...hence the reaction can occur longer.
 
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